JT Part 7 - Interior

Over the past few months we showed you how bring back a truck from the dead and have a blast with it on a working man’s budget. Having the essentials down such as the suspension, paint, wheels, electrical, and the drive-train already covered in our past issues, it’s only fitting to move into the interior of the truck.

Now the whole theme of this series of installs, is to show you that you can build a respectful truck that performs well and still turns heads, so with that being said we choose to rebuild as much of the factory items as we could with the help of the aftermarket suppliers that manufacture replacement parts.

Brothers’ truck parts located in Corona Ca is just one of the many establishments that specialize in reproduction parts for GM trucks. Without companies like Brothers’ it would be next to impossible to restore these old trucks.

Our plan of attack was plan and simple, restore as much of the interior, without spending a whole bunch of money, and with the steps that we’ll show you in this months installment, you to can achieve similar results. To make sure that we were keeping things on track we asked for the assistance from two professional shops on what were the best ways on restoring the interior using the parts supplied from Brothers’ truck parts.

To get the ball rolling we started at 714 Motorsports in Westminster Ca, were they showed us what’s the proper way to install a carpet kit which allowed us to install a 1995 Chevy split bench seat that we picked up from our favorite salvage yard, Chevy truck Salvage in Santa Ana Ca. From there, we put on a jacket, and headed over to Pete’s Auto Glass, were they showed us how to restore the vent windows, and replace the roll-up side glass back to factory specs. Follow along, as we make transform the look, and comfort of this project vehicle.

Joe Touring

Brothers provides you the do it yourselfer all the sound deadening materials, carpet padding, and original “Loop” style carpet all pre-cut to the factory specs.

Joe Touring

To learn the right way to install the carpet, we brought “JT” to 714 Motorsports in Westminster Ca. The first step is to allow the carpet, padding and sound deadening material to “relax” by unrolling them and spreading them out as shown here. If you can, lay them out in the sun for a few hours to warm up.

Joe Touring
Joe Touring

Now that the materials have had time to relax, apply some spray glue onto the floor area and the back side of the sound deadening material. Next lay out the material, and repeat the same process with the carpet padding.

Joe Touring
Joe Touring

Be sure to work the padding into the corners of the sheet metal as best as you can. Using the “butt” end of a hammer will help to lay the padding in properly. When finished, the kick boards, and cab floor should look like this.

Joe Touring

This high quality carpet kit has a molded plastic backing that is “pre-formed” to fit each particular C-10 floor. In the photo you can see where the “hump” has been molded into the carpet to fit with the floor. Use this as a reference on where to place the carpet down first as a trial fit.

Joe Touring
Joe Touring

We installed this floor shifter from Gennie Shifter to give the truck an older look and feel. To install the carpet we’ll have to cut the carpet to fit around the shifter. Run the carpet up tight to the shifter and cut a slit into the carpet using either a large pair of shears, like the pair in the photo, or a box knife.

Joe Touring

With a trial fitment of the carpet, its now time to spray out a coat of glue on both the back side of the carpet, and the padding. Start in the center and work your way to the outside of the cab one side at a time.

Joe Touring
Joe Touring

Brothers stocks these beautifully chrome plated high quality threshold plates that holds the carpet in place and keeps from it fraying at the ends during use. Line up the plates at the end of the carpet, and if need be use an awl or and ice pick to help you find the hole set by the factory.

Joe Touring
Joe Touring
Joe Touring

JT just celebrated its 40th birthday, which means that its time had come to replace all the window rubber and channels. A trip to One Piece Products, gave us the lowdown on how to replace all the components from Brothers Truck Parts. Ben first installed the “Run” channel by sliding it into the channel guides. Next he “pre-fit” the wind-wing to give him an idea of how much channel he needed to trim off using a pair of sheet metal shears.

Joe Touring
Joe Touring
Joe Touring

Ben installed the window regulators before dropping in the side glass. Using the window cranks, align the round guides into the glass track by pushing it into the track at the install notch.

Joe Touring
Joe Touring
Joe Touring

It’s easier to install the wind-wings by first turning them sideways and dropping the mount past the top of the door only then to turn them into position. Tilt them back while continuing to slide the side glass into the wind-wing channel. After we had things all lined up, Ben turned in the outside fasteners that travel through the door frame.

Joe Touring
Joe Touring

Now with all the glass in place, we fit and aligned all the window frame channels and tighten everything down.

Joe Touring
Joe Touring
Joe Touring

To keep the water and wind noise down, a new set of glass scrapers form Brothers were next to be installed. First test fit the scrapers by checking if the clips are aligned properly. Don’t clip them in without test fitting them first. To fit them accurately use a pair of sheet metal shears to cut the scrapers at the same angle as the wind-wing so when they are installed, everything will line up just right.

Joe Touring
Joe Touring

See how easy it is to clip them into place now by pushing the clips through the door frame, and look how good they fit by pre-fitting the scrapers before installing them.

Joe Touring
Joe Touring
Joe Touring

Brothers Truck Parts has everything that you need to complete your project with the same OEM quality parts. We needed to replace the seat belts, arm rests and door/window cranks, to really bring in some comfort. The window and door cranks are held in place with “horseshoe” clips that just push on to the “stems” of both the window regulator, and door linkage.

Joe Touring

The new seat belts install just like the factory ones and use the same factory fasteners. A “Torx” driver needs to be used to tighten the hardware down in place.

Joe Touring

To top things off so to speak, a new dash pad from Brothers finishes off things looking awesome, while offering safety to the cab as well.

Sources:
Brothers Truck Parts: www.brotherstruckparts.com
One Piece Products: www.onepieceproducts.com
714 Motorsports www.714motorsports.net
No Limit Engineering: www.nolimit.net